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Lake Weyba
27 Sep 2013
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Description

 

Lake Weyba 

Directions: 26 26¢ 28" S, 153 04¢ 41" E; the site has a general north-south orientation with a length of 13 km and a width of up to 5 km, with its centre 1 km south of Noosa Heads. It falls within the Sunshine Coast catchment (Queensland Department of Primary Industries 1993).
 
Bioregion: South Eastern Queensland.
Shire: Noosa and Maroochy.
Area : 2860 ha.
Elevation : 2-3 m ASL.
Other listed wetlands in same aggregation: The northern part of the Lake Weyba site is continguous with the Noosa River Wetlands (SEQ010QL).

 

"Weyba" is a large tidal lake just five minutes inland of Noosa and Peregian Beaches on the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia.

 

Lake Weyba can be accessed to the north via Noosaville, to the west via Doonan and to the south via Weyba Downs (formerly known as Peregian Beach South).

 

"Weyba" has aboriginal origins and is said to mean "place of stingrays" or "place of flying squirrels". 

 

Lake Weyba, a large, shallow salt-water lake, is an important fish-breeding habitat. In the early 1900s, Lake Weyba had a large number of stingrays, which would have been easy targets for the spears of the Aboriginal people. 

Two geological units are represented. The majority of the area is of Pleistocene origins as old tidal delta sand deposits. The landform is level sand plain with humus podosols and peaty podosols on poorly drained plains and depressions. These low lying areas are seasonally waterlogged and the water table can be permanently close to the surface. Depression areas are permanently waterlogged. The western part of the block is on Myrtle Creek sandstones of Triassic/Jurassic origins. The landform here is gently undulating rises of coarse grained quartzose sandstones. Soils are yellow podosolics or yellow earths, low in nutrients and with little or no structure.

Lake Weyba is a vital habitat for flora, fauna, marine and fish, also the environment is important to filter the waters of the Noosa River.

 

 

 

 

 

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