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Jardin Luxembourg Paris - 48.8567° N, 2.3508° E
14 Apr 2014
Description

This is a photo take at the Jardin Luxembourg in Paris. This was the second stop on my Fellowship. This park inspired me to think about the way that the public use their space. This park had infrastructure, it has hundreds of army green metal seats scattered throughout the park. Some of the seats sat upright and others designed for reclining. There were areas of full sunlight and other areas of shade. There were ponds, fountains, children's playground equipment, shelter for older folks doing some form of exercise with hiking sticks, cafes, buildings, cement areas where adults where facilitating small children to rude scooters and play with bubbles like an outdoor crèche.

 

Up until the very last few minutes in which I was in the park I noticed that no one was throwing the chairs, or hurting anyone, or stealing them. There were a group of teenagers who decided they wanted to sit too close to the pond and I suddenly heard a whistle from which some park official (not police) but security was gesturing for them to relocate further back to keep the view in condition for all in the area.

 

This park provided me with an insight that I had been speaking with Ted Purves back in February at the Spectres of Evaluation Conference in Melbourne - the concept of the "Public or Publics". In Australia we (for many reasons) refer much more to the audience even if they are passing by on their way to catch a train. I say this in a broad sense specifically in the performing arts area, while the visual art sectors might reference a participating public; it is still an emerging term.

 

A term I want to spend more time thinking about. Not just thinking about notions of public space and how i use public space as the site or venue for my artistic work.

 

But also who are the public? What does this mean in terms of what we call a "public service"? Who blows the whistle when the public want to do something? Who blows the whistle when they get stopped? What kind of artwork do they want to see? Where do they see it? Is it free? Or do we need more space that has opportunity, infrastructure or just some bloody chairs for people to sit and talk, or eat their lunch or relax?

 

I am keen to consider this term beyond the role of an audience. Audience and the development of them is an afterthought for most artists in Australia. I am keen to bring the public front and centre into my work, as part of the collaboration. I am also going to spend some time thinking beyond the term community, which is also used a lot in Australia, as perhaps this term brings connotations, which not everyone enjoys. Then others feel very connected and would be offended to not be included in their community. Maybe there is a place for all three works.

 

Audience - Community – Publics - ?

 

 

Comments (5)
Feral Arts Thu, 24 Apr 2014 3:35pm

Yes its interesting to think about what we mean by the 'public' in public space. For us its a reminder of the young people and public space work we did in Logan and in South Bank (Brisbane) in the early 1990's where 'public' did not include young people. The failure to consider and include them in the design and programming contributed to serious conflicts with police, secutiry and local businesses. This work ended up all being about the need for inclusiveness and an understanding of diversity in our communities.

Neal price Fri, 2 May 2014 10:19am

And what a special garden it is too! I spent some time there during my Arts and Health Tour in 95. Another amazing garden I did visit was Jardin de Wiltz in Luxembourg created by Herbert Maly and his team at Cooperations located next to the Prabbeli centre. This garden was constructed on the site of an abandoned Brewery by artists, people with disabilities and unemployed in the area. It features a rediscovered waterway, hand built windmills and many works of art including willow sculptures and works by visiting Artists in Residence. A must see on your tour Lenine and only a short train journey from Gay Paris.

miranda phill Tue, 25 Oct 2016 9:27am

Only a smiling visitant here to share the love (:,

http://zogogames.com

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Like this informational review post and you can check my flashlight reviews too.

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Like this informational review post and you can check my flashlight reviews too.

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Lenine is an award winning professional community engaged arts practitioner and creative producer who has worked across a diverse range of arts and cultural forms.

She works to engage people, groups and communities in arts and cultural exchanges and experiences. This work is always created around specific social, environmental or cultural issues impacting the people involved.  She has worked across visual and performing arts, including producing and curating large-scale events, festivals, community arts programs, exhibitions, live arts and research and policy development. She has been the Executive Director  of Young People and the Arts Australia and Artistic Director of Contact Inc and most recently finished her time as Director of Community Partnerships at the Australia Council for the Arts. Currently she is an independent practitioner working nationally but based in Brisbane.

Recognised as a leader in the Community Arts and Cultural Development sector nationally in 2005 with the inaugural Kirk Robson award and then again in 2013 with the Australia Council fellowship in Community Partnerships. She is an advocate for diversity in the arts and diverse communities in the public domain. This work is delivered not only as an artist but also through sector development, as a published writer, public facilitator, committee member and community organiser.  She aspires to make change, which supports artists and communities to live socially and culturally rich lives. Her work is regarded as innovative, collaborative, having integrity and partnership orientated.  

Her ongoing program with children and young people is called The Walking Neighbourhood, details can be found at www.thewalkingneighbourhood.com.au. And when she was 5 her mum trusted her enough to sit in a cinema and watch a movie by herself, and now she parents a wildly energetic 3 year old who thinks she is a triceratops. 

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Lenine is an award winning professional community engaged arts practitioner and creative producer who has worked across a diverse range of arts and cultural forms.

She works to engage people, groups and communities in arts and cultural exchanges and experiences. This work is always created around specific social, environmental or cultural issues impacting the people involved.  She has worked across visual and performing arts, including producing and curating large-scale events, festivals, community arts programs, exhibitions, live arts and research and policy development. She has been the Executive Director  of Young People and the Arts Australia and Artistic Director of Contact Inc and most recently finished her time as Director of Community Partnerships at the Australia Council for the Arts. Currently she is an independent practitioner working nationally but based in Brisbane.

Recognised as a leader in the Community Arts and Cultural Development sector nationally in 2005 with the inaugural Kirk Robson award and then again in 2013 with the Australia Council fellowship in Community Partnerships. She is an advocate for diversity in the arts and diverse communities in the public domain. This work is delivered not only as an artist but also through sector development, as a published writer, public facilitator, committee member and community organiser.  She aspires to make change, which supports artists and communities to live socially and culturally rich lives. Her work is regarded as innovative, collaborative, having integrity and partnership orientated.  

Her ongoing program with children and young people is called The Walking Neighbourhood, details can be found at www.thewalkingneighbourhood.com.au. And when she was 5 her mum trusted her enough to sit in a cinema and watch a movie by herself, and now she parents a wildly energetic 3 year old who thinks she is a triceratops. 

[bio_text] => Lenine is an award winning professional community engaged arts practitioner and creative producer who has worked across a diverse range of arts and cultural forms. She works to engage people, groups and communities in arts and cultural exchanges and experiences. This work is always created around specific social, environmental or cultural issues impacting the people involved. She has worked across visual and performing arts, including producing and curating large-scale events, festivals, community arts programs, exhibitions, live arts and research and policy development. She has been the Executive Director of Young People and the Arts Australia and Artistic Director of Contact Inc and most recently finished her time as Director of Community Partnerships at the Australia Council for the Arts. Currently she is an independent practitioner working nationally but based in Brisbane. Recognised as a leader in the Community Arts and Cultural Development sector nationally in 2005 with the inaugural Kirk Robson award and then again in 2013 with the Australia Council fellowship in Community Partnerships. She is an advocate for diversity in the arts and diverse communities in the public domain. This work is delivered not only as an artist but also through sector development, as a published writer, public facilitator, committee member and community organiser. She aspires to make change, which supports artists and communities to live socially and culturally rich lives. Her work is regarded as innovative, collaborative, having integrity and partnership orientated. Her ongoing program with children and young people is called The Walking Neighbourhood, details can be found at www.thewalkingneighbourhood.com.au. And when she was 5 her mum trusted her enough to sit in a cinema and watch a movie by herself, and now she parents a wildly energetic 3 year old who thinks she is a triceratops. 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This is a photo take at the Jardin Luxembourg in Paris. This was the second stop on my Fellowship. This park inspired me to think about the way that the public use their space. This park had infrastructure, it has hundreds of army green metal seats scattered throughout the park. Some of the seats sat upright and others designed for reclining. There were areas of full sunlight and other areas of shade. There were ponds, fountains, children's playground equipment, shelter for older folks doing some form of exercise with hiking sticks, cafes, buildings, cement areas where adults where facilitating small children to rude scooters and play with bubbles like an outdoor crèche.

 

Up until the very last few minutes in which I was in the park I noticed that no one was throwing the chairs, or hurting anyone, or stealing them. There were a group of teenagers who decided they wanted to sit too close to the pond and I suddenly heard a whistle from which some park official (not police) but security was gesturing for them to relocate further back to keep the view in condition for all in the area.

 

This park provided me with an insight that I had been speaking with Ted Purves back in February at the Spectres of Evaluation Conference in Melbourne - the concept of the "Public or Publics". In Australia we (for many reasons) refer much more to the audience even if they are passing by on their way to catch a train. I say this in a broad sense specifically in the performing arts area, while the visual art sectors might reference a participating public; it is still an emerging term.

 

A term I want to spend more time thinking about. Not just thinking about notions of public space and how i use public space as the site or venue for my artistic work.

 

But also who are the public? What does this mean in terms of what we call a "public service"? Who blows the whistle when the public want to do something? Who blows the whistle when they get stopped? What kind of artwork do they want to see? Where do they see it? Is it free? Or do we need more space that has opportunity, infrastructure or just some bloody chairs for people to sit and talk, or eat their lunch or relax?

 

I am keen to consider this term beyond the role of an audience. Audience and the development of them is an afterthought for most artists in Australia. I am keen to bring the public front and centre into my work, as part of the collaboration. I am also going to spend some time thinking beyond the term community, which is also used a lot in Australia, as perhaps this term brings connotations, which not everyone enjoys. Then others feel very connected and would be offended to not be included in their community. Maybe there is a place for all three works.

 

Audience - Community – Publics - ?

 

 

[descrip_html] =>

This is a photo take at the Jardin Luxembourg in Paris. This was the second stop on my Fellowship. This park inspired me to think about the way that the public use their space. This park had infrastructure, it has hundreds of army green metal seats scattered throughout the park. Some of the seats sat upright and others designed for reclining. There were areas of full sunlight and other areas of shade. There were ponds, fountains, children's playground equipment, shelter for older folks doing some form of exercise with hiking sticks, cafes, buildings, cement areas where adults where facilitating small children to rude scooters and play with bubbles like an outdoor crèche.

 

Up until the very last few minutes in which I was in the park I noticed that no one was throwing the chairs, or hurting anyone, or stealing them. There were a group of teenagers who decided they wanted to sit too close to the pond and I suddenly heard a whistle from which some park official (not police) but security was gesturing for them to relocate further back to keep the view in condition for all in the area.

 

This park provided me with an insight that I had been speaking with Ted Purves back in February at the Spectres of Evaluation Conference in Melbourne - the concept of the "Public or Publics". In Australia we (for many reasons) refer much more to the audience even if they are passing by on their way to catch a train. I say this in a broad sense specifically in the performing arts area, while the visual art sectors might reference a participating public; it is still an emerging term.

 

A term I want to spend more time thinking about. Not just thinking about notions of public space and how i use public space as the site or venue for my artistic work.

 

But also who are the public? What does this mean in terms of what we call a "public service"? Who blows the whistle when the public want to do something? Who blows the whistle when they get stopped? What kind of artwork do they want to see? Where do they see it? Is it free? Or do we need more space that has opportunity, infrastructure or just some bloody chairs for people to sit and talk, or eat their lunch or relax?

 

I am keen to consider this term beyond the role of an audience. Audience and the development of them is an afterthought for most artists in Australia. I am keen to bring the public front and centre into my work, as part of the collaboration. I am also going to spend some time thinking beyond the term community, which is also used a lot in Australia, as perhaps this term brings connotations, which not everyone enjoys. Then others feel very connected and would be offended to not be included in their community. Maybe there is a place for all three works.

 

Audience - Community – Publics - ?

 

 

[descrip_text] => This is a photo take at the Jardin Luxembourg in Paris. This was the second stop on my Fellowship. This park inspired me to think about the way that the public use their space. This park had infrastructure, it has hundreds of army green metal seats scattered throughout the park. Some of the seats sat upright and others designed for reclining. There were areas of full sunlight and other areas of shade. There were ponds, fountains, children's playground equipment, shelter for older folks doing some form of exercise with hiking sticks, cafes, buildings, cement areas where adults where facilitating small children to rude scooters and play with bubbles like an outdoor crche. Up until the very last few minutes in which I was in the park I noticed that no one was throwing the chairs, or hurting anyone, or stealing them. There were a group of teenagers who decided they wanted to sit too close to the pond and I suddenly heard a whistle from which some park official (not police) but security was gesturing for them to relocate further back to keep the view in condition for all in the area. This park provided me with an insight that I had been speaking with Ted Purves back in February at the Spectres of Evaluation Conference in Melbourne - the concept of the "Public or Publics". In Australia we (for many reasons) refer much more to the audience even if they are passing by on their way to catch a train. I say this in a broad sense specifically in the performing arts area, while the visual art sectors might reference a participating public; it is still an emerging term. A term I want to spend more time thinking about. Not just thinking about notions of public space and how i use public space as the site or venue for my artistic work. But also who are the public? What does this mean in terms of what we call a "public service"? Who blows the whistle when the public want to do something? Who blows the whistle when they get stopped? What kind of artwork do they want to see? Where do they see it? Is it free? Or do we need more space that has opportunity, infrastructure or just some bloody chairs for people to sit and talk, or eat their lunch or relax? I am keen to consider this term beyond the role of an audience. Audience and the development of them is an afterthought for most artists in Australia. I am keen to bring the public front and centre into my work, as part of the collaboration. I am also going to spend some time thinking beyond the term community, which is also used a lot in Australia, as perhaps this term brings connotations, which not everyone enjoys. Then others feel very connected and would be offended to not be included in their community. Maybe there is a place for all three works. Audience - Community Publics - ? [duration] => [duration_fmt] => [display_date] => 2014-04-14 [hi] => 1 [lo] => 1 [story_img_id] => 149263 [fullscreen_img_id] => [story_img_info] => [fullscreen_img_info] => [story_email] => [stats_num_views] => 198 [stats_num_likes] => 0 [moreinfo_url] => [eval] => [perm_allow_embedding] => 1 [perm_share] => 1 [dec_story_img_info] => [ts_created] => 1397600815 [ts_last_updated] => 0 ) [_inited:protected] => 1 ) [1] => 149262 ) ) [9] => Array ( [file] => /var/www/vhosts/placstor/placestories.com/public_html/mnt/placstor/public_html/placestories/app/pages/story/switcher.php [line] => 73 [args] => Array ( [0] => /var/www/vhosts/placstor/placestories.com/public_html/mnt/placstor/public_html/placestories/app/pages/story/main/story_home_pagegen.php ) [function] => require_once ) ) [previous:Error:private] => ) ) ) )