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Wendell Berry
27 Jun 2012
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The 2012 Jefferson Lecture at the Kennedy Center was delivered by Wendell Berry, the seminal Kentucky writer and activist known for addressing intersections of people and place. A transcription of the lecture in its entirety can be found here, along with an interview and further information on past Jefferson Lectures. The two-paragraph excerpt of Mr. Berry's speech below is especially moving in how it calls on all citizens – rural and urban – to return to first principles to find their relationship to place and practice:

“I will say, from my own belief and experience, that imagination thrives on contact, on tangible connection. For humans to have a responsible relationship to the world, they must imagine their places in it. To have a place, to live and belong in a place, to live from a place without destroying it, we must imagine it. By imagination we see it illuminated by its own unique character and by our love for it. By imagination we recognize with sympathy the fellow members, human and nonhuman, with whom we share our place. By that local experience we see the need to grant a sort of preemptive sympathy to all the fellow members, the neighbors, with whom we share the world. As imagination enables sympathy, sympathy enables affection. And it is in affection that we find the possibility of a neighborly, kind, and conserving economy.

“Obviously there is some risk in making affection the pivot of an argument about economy. The charge will be made that affection is an emotion, merely “subjective,” and therefore that all affections are more or less equal: people may have affection for their children and their automobiles, their neighbors and their weapons. But the risk, I think, is only that affection is personal. If it is not personal, it is nothing; we don’t, at least, have to worry about governmental or corporate affection. And one of the endeavors of human cultures, from the beginning, has been to qualify and direct the influence of emotion. The word “affection” and the terms of value that cluster around it—love, care, sympathy, mercy, forbearance, respect, reverence—have histories and meanings that raise the issue of worth. We should, as our culture has warned us over and over again, give our affection to things that are true, just, and beautiful. When we give affection to things that are destructive, we are wrong. A large machine in a large, toxic, eroded cornfield is not, properly speaking, an object or a sign of affection.

For The Art of the Rural’s full commentary on Mr. Berry’s essay, follow this link

Tags
Climate Change Community Culture Education Environment Health History Justice Recovery Rural/Regional Agriculture Books/Writing Kentucky Poetry Politics/Conference Protest Southeast
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